Posts tagged Gentle Strength
12 Signs You May Be a Highly Sensitive Person

We talk a lot around here about being a Highly Sensitive Person - but we’ve never really paused to look at what that means. And for many of us, untangling this term and recognizing that there are others like us can unlock whole new levels of self-understanding, self-compassion, and even self-forgiveness. So let's break it down.

Read More
Three Cheers for Being Highly Sensitive!

A lot of the time when we talk about what it’s like to be a sensitive person, we wind up focusing on the challenges. In a lot of ways, that makes sense. Because the list of things that can feel especially heavy, or stressful, or overwhelming for us is a long one. I’m definitely guilty of focusing on that list too, partly because it feels like an important way to acknowledge and honor the complexities of our experiences. It’s why I spend time and energy writing about things like what to do when our relationships feel out of balance, how to diffuse overwhelming fear, and how to know when it's safe to push our boundaries

Read More
The Most Fruitful Place to Invest Your Energy

I’m an absolute sucker for personality quizzes and assessments, both classic and new. Always have been.Myers-Briggs was my gateway drug into the world of personality types, thanks to my dad. I remember taking it for the first time, and feeling bowled over by the depth and accuracy of those results. While my exact MBTI type has changed since I first took it as a preteen (I’m an INFJ these days) I still find a real sense of home in that personality description – and I like to revisit and reread it when I need some extra reminding and reassurance.

Read More
Words as Trail Markers: Some Favorites for the New Year

From looking around at all the people I love and admire online, it seems like everyone has their own way of moving from one year into the next. Some are eager to sit down with their resource of choice - their Desire Map or their PowerSheets or some other introspective guide - to carefully go over what happened last year, and how to shape the coming year. They reflect, and they brainstorm, and they plan. (This is me. And it takes an embarrassing amount of restraint not to want to use #allthetools.)

Read More
It's Ok to Need a Change in Direction

There’s something so satisfying about arriving at an answer, solution, or a decision that sticks. Maybe it’s a promising relationship you stumbled into after a sea of bad first dates; or the new name for your blog or business that came to you out of nowhere after months of racking your brain for ideas; or the new workout studio that seems to be holding your interest longer than all those other gym memberships before it. The one that makes you think, “THIS. Yes. This’ll be the one that changes things for the better.”

Read More
Bloom Inch by Inch: Be an Antenna

When feelings of uncertaintly and discontent pop up, it’s super natural to cling to the questions of, “What’s going on here?” and “How do I fix it?” – but sometimes the hunt for those answers can suck the drive and motivation right out of us. We've talked about being an antenna vs. being a ‘hunter’, and learning to trust that we’ll be receptive and ready to receive the information we need as it comes. But what does that actually look like?

Read More
When Being Insightful Feels Exhausting

As highly self-aware introspective people, we’re really good at noticing when something feels ‘off’ or ‘not quite right’ – and so often, our impulse is to move immediately into Detective Mode. But let's be honest - that 'information hunter' approach to being an introspective person can start to feel exhausting. But what if there's a better way?

Read More
Questioning the Stories We Tell Ourselves

We all have these narratives that run in the background of our consciousness as we go through our days. They’re stories we tell ourselves (consciously or not) about why the people around us do the things they do, what they mean, and what’s about to happen next. And if you’re anything like me, it can be startling to notice how often they involve jumping to negative conclusions.

Read More